Arizona republican 19011130 ,, Arizona Republican

Lundi 14 déc 2015

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Arizona republican, 1901-11-30

Arizona republican, 1901-11-30

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THE AKIZONA REPUBLICAN Ten Pages Ten Pages PnOENTX!, ARIZONA, SAT U It DAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 30, 1901. VOL. XII. NO. 196. TWELFTH YEAB. END OF THE WAR There is No Immediate Trouble in Panama SURRENDER OF COLON It Came About in a Bloodless Way Through ;the Peace-Loving Foreigners, hut the liberals Were Downcast Because They Could Not Go Along Making Harmless Demonstrations. Colon. Nov. 29. The terms of the surrender agreed upon at yesterday’s ; conference held on board the I’nlted States gunboat Marietta, at which the j commanding officers of the ‘ Marietta, , the British cruiser Tribune and the , French cruiser Suchet, Lieutenant I’ommander McCrea of the Machias. Captain Perry of the Iowa, Generals Alban and Jeffries, representing the government of Colombia, Senor te la Kosa, who represented the liberal party, were present, were briefly, as follows: Senor De La Rosa agrreed to surrender the liberal soldiers now at Colon with their arms, to Captain Perry at noon today; Captain Perry, in turn, agrreed to hand over the rr.fcu and their arms, later in the day, to Oeneral Alban who. In turn, guaranteed the life and liberty of all men recently in arms against the conservative government of Colombia. The surrender of arms was to be bona file in every respect. At half-past .eleven o’clock this morning a large number of marines in blue, jackets from the Iowa, the Marietta and the Machias were landed at Colon and proceeded to the barracks. Here the arms belonging to the liberal soldiers were taken over by the Americans in the presence of Captain Perry, and the commanders of the warships above mentioned and the American, British and French consuls at Colon and a large concourse of people who sympathized with the liberals In their surrender. The liberal guard, patrolling Colon, appeared sad and downcast. Their behavior, however, has all along been most praiseworthy, and it is not an exaggeration to say that they have gained the respect of a large portion of the community, especially of the foreign element, during th?ir short administration of Colon. Later in the day. General Alban, accompanied by the offlijals of the conservative government of Colon, arrived here from Panama, and Senor De’La Rosa, representing General Do-  » 7.r 7, creiary ne . surrendered himself and the liberal troops to the conservative general, in the presence of Captain Perry and the naval and consular officers above mentioned.NEW SHOOTING HECOHD An Explanation of Dr. Walker’s He-cent Victory. The bird destroying controversy which has for sometime been going on between Dr. M. M. Walker and County Treasurer J. E. Walker was resumed « yesterday with all Its old time and homicidal bitterness. The recrudescence of this dispute was occasioned by the circumstance that in a bird shooting match between Dr. Walker and W. L. Pinney the latter was beaten. At the same time the field record in this locality was broken and the populace was inclined to crown the doctor, the – case has to do with the right of con-champion of events, in which the birds suinptlves to land here as Immigrants. TAKE A RECORD. See How Many Krfends Are Hurt Coffee. By It would be just as reasonable for a temperance advocate to drink a little diluted whisky as to drink coffee, for one is as truly an intoxicant as the other, and persistence in the use of coffee brings on a variety of chronic diseases, notorious among which are dyspepsia, heart palpitation (and ultimately heart failure), frequently con- ptipation, kidney diseases, many cases Frank James will portray the charac-of weak eyes and trembling condition 1 ter c- a prosperous westerner and will of the nerves. I geen m prince Albert coat, creased This in only a small percentage o trousers and a fedora hat. The curtain the great variety of diseases which wiH go down in the liist act with James come from an unbalanced nervous sys- j n tne center of tne 6taffe. When seen tern, caused by the persistent daily use tHv Bnl(1. or me urug caneine, nn-n v- tive principle of coffee. Another bit of prima facie evidence about coffee Is that the victims to the habit find great difficulty In giving it up. They will solemnly pledge to themselves day after day that they will abandon the use of it when they know that it Is shortening their days, but morning after morning they fail, until they grow to despise themselves for their lack of control. x Anyone interested in this subject would be greatly surprised to make a systematic inquiry among prominent brain workers In America. There are hundreds of thousands of our most prominent people that have abandoned’ coffee altogether and are using Postum Food Coffee in its place, and for the most excellent reasons In the world. Many of them testify that ill-health, nervous prostration, and consequent inability to work, has In times past, pushed them back and out of their proper standing In life, which they have been able to regain by the use of good health, strong nerves, and great vitality, since coffee has been thrown out and Postum put in its place. have to be hunted and when found fly up in a natural and confusing way. This is supposed to be a better test of skill than In shooting; birds released from the trap with mathematical precision and at regular intervals. County Treasurer Walker is disposed to decry the performance o Dr. Walker. He says that It was largely the result of scratch and luck: that in the first place he beat Mr. Pinney by only two birds and in the next there was an interposition of providence in his behalf, of a kind that doesn’t happen once in a thousand years. The doctor, he said, by accident selected the better field and ran into a labyrinth of birds the like of which the oldest inhabitant had never seen. Whe-.i the aoctor stumbled in amonjr thorn they fiew into the air in confusion and circled about trying to find their ‘war- ings so that they could fly away. While ‘ the birds were taking observations the I doctor recovered from shls excitement i and bepan to turn his gun loose into the air. Every shot was necessarily fatal. The doctor hastily threw Li , more cartridges and kept shooting with the result that he soon had himself covered with a feathered canopy formed by the falling birds. Even the sunlight was obscured. In those circumstances, said County Treasurer Walker a second rater might win. He was glad to learn that Dr. Walker had at last beaten somebody; that fact would enhance the value of his own numerous victories over the doctor. Among those present while the coun ty treasurer was making this explanation of the triumph of Dr. Walker was Neri Osborn, the lerk of the board of supervisors who said that he had heard ; so much about shooting lately that hi was almost Inclined to recover some of his old time skill. His long suit was the rifle. It was deer killing that iiad brought him into national prominence and he related an incident of which most old Arizonians have heard and which Indeed has been embalmed in verse by an eastern poet who was in this country for his health and witnessed the performance. It happened, or rather « happen » Is not a good word for that is suggestive of an accident: this thing was enacted on the Santa Maria. The party of which Mr. Osborn was a member saw a deer at so great a distance that there seemed no possibility of taking It. In the absence of athir-teen-inch naval or coast defense gun and there was none nearer than Pre-cott or Yuma. Mr.’ Osborn took what every one believed to be a futile aim with his rifle and pulled the trigger. In a few minutes the deer was observed to fall: the bullet had Just reached him. Then he got up but another shot from the same unerring rifle brought him down again, this time permanently: Mr. OFborn had secured the exact range. When the hunters reached the deer the flesh was found to b? tainted. It was a very warm day in June atri meat could not be kept waiting while a long journey was being made after it. CONSUMPTIVES MUST GO Holing of the Department in the BidenCast Sustained. New York. Nov. 23. tTnited States judge Thomas, sitting in the circuit ft . ,, t , , . . court in Brooklyn, today decided in favor of the ruling of the treasury department at Washington in the case of Thomas Bodin. of Philadelphia. The decision prohibits Bodin, a supposed consumptive, from remaining in the country. Unless the case is appealed to the circuit court of appeals Bodin will be deported one week from tomorrow, probably on the steamship Etrurla, Bodin’s wife and child nave remained from choice at Ellis island, and will accompany Bodin back. Judge Thomas decides thatasasimple question of facts was before him, in the premises he could not officially do otherwise than sustain the treasury department. No question of law, he observes, has been propounded in the writ of habeas cor- pus sworn out by Bodin’s lawyer, The NEW THEATRICAL SUMMARY. Frank James Ex-Bandit Will Take the Stge. Zanesville, O., Nov. 20. After long years of deliberation Frank James, the ex-bandit. Is to become an actor. He will make his professional debut in this city tonight in a play entitled « Across the Continent. » The company will tour Ol.io and several states east. It will not appear west of the Mississippi. This move marks radical change of purpose ‘on my part. But I can do now, without offense to public sentiment, what I could not have done years ago before I had given indisputable proof by my conduct that the apprehensions of those who had no faith in me4 were groundless. I do not expect to be an actor in the true sense of the word. I don t delude myself that I have any talent, and my appearance on the stage will be more of a personal exhibit than a dramatic performance, , ALABAMA M. E. CHURCH. Annison. Ala., Nov. 29. Many delegates and visitors have arrived for th annual North Alabama conference of the M. E. church. South, which will be formality opened here this evening and continue in session through the remain der of the week. Bishop Hendrlx will preside and addresses will be delivered by a number of well known preachers and lavmen. Before adiournlne tha meeting will appoint aeiegates to uw general conference or tne aenomina- tion to be held in Dallas next May. FILIPINO FINANGE How Business ot the Islands May Be Subserved Recommendation by Special Commissioner Conant of a Special Silver Coin to Supplant the Prevalent Mexican Dollar. Washington. Nov. 29. Accompanying: the annual report of Secretary Oage. is a report made by Special Commissioner Charles A. Conant. who was sent to ,he Philippines to investigate the cur- reury fiuiion. ni mum inriiuainiun j will be submitted to congress for its ‘ ri, j lie iiiil iiiihii iuiu ai r . nut. ‘ there shouM be a distinctively Philip-l pine coin’ of silver which Hhall be a legal tender for fifty cents gold, be called the peso and contain twenty-five grammes of silver. The coin Is to be Issued in such quantities as the trade requires, a:vl sustained at a parity with gold by a limitation of the amount coined. The Mexican silver dollar and other coins shall cease to be legal tender after a certain date. It is also recommended that the national banks both of the Philippines and the United States should have authority to estab iisn branches throughout the Islands. and in the United States. The power to issue notes should not he extended ! to any bank having- a capital of les3 i meeting in this city to discuss y’-than $ »00.000. Mort?a?e banks with a 1 terday’s prize fiht between Terry Mc-capital of not lass than a million are ‘, Govern and Young Corbett. The recommended to make loans on real i league will listen to the report by estate. It is recommended that the i treasurer of the t’nited States be authorized to receive deposits from the government of the Philippine islands, and that the treasury of the Philippine islands may be designated by the secretary of war as the legal depository of public moneys. THE STATUS OF THE UTILE It is Now Being Determined in Justice Burnett’s Court. The establishment of the status of the mule in Maricopa county was begun in the court o! Justice Burnett yesterday morning. This matter came up in the case of John M. Hardee against Maricopa county, Charles Pendergast and his bondsmen ex rel. On September 20 of thi3 year a mule belonging to the plaintiff while trying to cross a cul vert in road district No. 2 of which Mr. l endcryast is Uferisor, fe!! through the structure and sustained injuries which have ever since kept him in a state of either incapacity or convalescence. After remonstrating with the board of supervisors for some time on the defective condition of the culvert without any material or financial result, Mr. Hardee brought suit against the county in the sum of S5J and employed Messrs. Baker and Bennett, a firm of toOQ attorneys to collect it for him. The defense is represented by Messrs’. Alexander and Bullard. Mr. Alexander’s interest In the case Is more than professional: he is one of Pendergast’s bondsmen. There was as much difficulty in getting a Jury as if it were a notable murder case and one was not secured until the middle of the afternoon. Ten witnesses were examined for the plaintiff and the sun went uown so that the case was continued until today. Among the witnesses was County Treasurer J. E. Walker, by whose expert testimony the plaintiff desired to find out whether there were any funds to the credit of road dls- t trict No. 2; if there were there would be fome hope of recovery against the county. That was evidently a thought of Mr. Alexander’s. Another expert witness was Dr. F. O. Richmond, who testified as to the dilapidated condition of the mule when he was called in the middle of the night to treat him. He said that all the ligaments were torn from one fore leg and It looked at the time as if it would be necssary to shoot him. He had seen the mule later and while there was an improvement to be noted the mule was still not at himself and perhaps never would be. At present he was walkmg on the heels of his fore feeet and did not seem disposed to adopt any other style of locomotion. He further manifested a general indifference regarding all kinds of farm work. The inference drawn from Dr. Richmond’s testimony was that the mule was less valuable than no mule at all and that the county should b compelled to pay additional damages for not having killed him outright. Then the doctor was subjected to cross-examination by Mr. Alexander, who thought he had caught the witness In a professional error. He understood him to say something about the ligaments on the front part of the mule’s leg when Captain Alexander and ev ery other anatomist, knows that a mule has no ligaments there and If he had them he would not know what to do with them. Dr. Richmond explained that he had spoken only of the ligaments behind the bones of the fore leg. Captain Alexander accepted the explanation and the case proceeded. It was developed that the defense is going to rely largely on a charge of contributory carelessness against the mule. The prosecution is threatening to bring the mule Into court today la- beled -Exhibit No. 1. » FIVE MILES OF HIGH FENCE. Enclosure for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Site About to be Built. St. Louis. Nov. 29. Three contracts hnVA hppn let fnr the construction Of ! the fencing which will enclose the site of the world’s fair at St. Louis in 1903.1 The length is about five miles, enclos- I . ins nearly two square nuien i uu. une miie ot tne tence ih to ue an ujhj j barrier, with steel pickets eight feet high, separating the site from the re-mainder of Forest park: three miles are to be of boards eight feet high topped with barbed wire, and the remaining mile will be of ornamental slabs made of cement strengthened with woven wire. The work Is to be completed within sixty days. ACTIVITY OF FILIPINOS. Manila. Nov. 29. The insurgents are active in the Batangas province. Brigadier Gneeral Bell with a battalion of the Fifth infantry will leave here today to assume command of the troop in Batangas. Recently the insurgents killed a, merchant In the town of ila-tangas, and terrorised the people living in the outskirts of the town, a:id escaped afttr a running fight with a small detachment of the Klghth infantry.PACIFIC MAIL. MUST PAY. San Francisco. Nov. 09. United rcaies commissioner nonn received & i communication today from National . I Commissioner Powderly. advising him that the department had ruled against . the contention of the general agent of . the Pacific Mail Steamship company. I ition was not liable that that corporat for a head tax of $1 on each alien sea. man discharged at this port. THEY SAW THE FIGHT And Think It Was Brutal, Degrading Went So Bepetition. Hartford, oenn.. Nov. :. It is an- nounced today that on Monday the tate Law and Order League will hold « v. Harold Pattison of the First Baptist church, and Colonel Charl Jewell, president of the Hartford Y. M. C. A., who were present at the match as delegates of the league. It la stated that this riort wil! characterize the bout us a brutal affair, A disgrace to Hartford and degrading. It Is also added that a legislative looking toward the abolition of such contests, will be consicered. OPERATION ON GOV. TAFT. Manila, Nov. 29. An operation performed on Governor Taft this afternoon was successful. He expects to start for Washington, December 10, to confer with Secretary Root. LABOR IN PORTO RICO. San Juan, Porto Rico, Nov. 29.- mass meeting of the local labor as- sociations of Porto Rico last evening caned by Santiago IRIeftlas, the agent or tne American Federation or Laoor. i’M.-uiy conaunea. Iplefflas met with tome opponttion. he appeared confident of uniting the local trade organizations with the American Federation of Labor. ILLINOIS MINING. Sprinpfleld. 111.. Nov. 29. Members of the state mining: board of Illinois met in special session at the state house yesterday. The purpose of the meeting is to examine candidates applying; for certificates as mine managers, mine examiners and hoisting engineers. LETTER CARRIERS MEET. Rockford. III.. Nov. 29. Preparations have been completed for the reception and entertainment of the delegates to ths annual convention of the state association of letter carriers, v.’hich will be held In Rockford tomorrow. Indl- cations, point to the largest convention in the -history of the association. THE ARMY AND NAVY Gridiron The Seventh Annual Contest, Philadelphia. Pa.. Nov. 29. Tomor- row. at Franklin Field, for the seventh time the army and navy will meet on the gridiron. At the last contest the army received an unexpected defeat, that quite took the conceit out of the.value8 from what have been refrarded soldiers, who. with their friends and adherents, had believed there could be but on result to the game. The navy proved It otherwise. The army Intends to redeem the day tomorrow. Whether intention and. fact will be In wedlock Joined is the question now. Meanwhile both teams have been in earnest training for the only game they really care to win. The rivalry though intense is most generous, and nd is oniy mat w men comes irom tne pro- of national defense. Six games have been played hereto- fore. The army won two of these and West Point In 1890, when the score was’t army, 0; navy 24. The second, at An-j.f. napolls. in 1S91, when the armyJ » turned the tables on the navy and beat it by a score of 32 to 16. The navy was overwhelmed with mortification, and sent a team the next year to West X Point that reversed the result by score of 12 to the navy to 4 for the’y army. In 1S93, the navy, at Annapolis, I X was victorious by a score of 6 to Then came an Interval of six years be- jf tween games, largely, if not entirely, .C due to the charge emanating fromj army circles that thwe contests engen- (y dered bad feeling between the two in- V stltutions. This idea has been stren- 1 uously combated. A better opinion prevailed fn 1899, and the result was’X that at Franklin Field the army won’- by a score of 17 to 5. The soldiers’; found a weak spot in the line of the’ navy and battered at it all the time ‘ y-and won their laurels by an applica-jj tlon of good army tactics on the grld-’J. iron hitting the enemy hardest where v you find him weakest. Last year the navy again turned the tables on the ‘ young men from West Point by win-’ nlng by a score of li to 11. A large delegation of army and navy . m.,i., i.. special train from Washington. NORTHERN BOUNDARY From Crest of Rockies to the Pacific Coast An International Commission to Make a Final Decision Treaty Hade in 1846 bnt Line Never Fixed. Seattle, Nov. 29. An international boundary commission is to be established by the United States and Canada, the object being to finally deterr mine the correct boundary of the Mount Baker mining district. The United States geological survey , has issued a bulletin, which outlines the plan and describes tne purposes as follows; -. Uurlng the past summer tne (.nitea states geological survey aim me and geodetic survey have been co-oper- « tins In a work of unusual importance and Interest in redetermining the line of the international boundary oetween tne united states unci canuus liumi the crest of the Rocky mountains to the Pacific ocean. The original treaty, signed in 1S4, which established the boundary at the 49th parallel, did not provide for its Immediate survey over this section. This was due partly to the extreme difficulty and even danger of conducting surveys In this region at the time, and partly to the prevailing opinions that so rough and distant a region would be settled i only in a very remote future, j This view still prevailed to a certain I extent when In 1857 and 1S51 surveys f were actually carried out. for it was n-A..nrnon. thof it was Inexpedient to incur the expense of locating and marking the boundary continuously because, as they say in their official report, the country would not be occupied for generations to ginning to pour into Chicago for the come. The commissions did, however, ‘ meeting of the National Live Stock as-determine the 49th parallel by astro-’ sociation next week, and attend the nomlcal observations, and established monumenta accordingly on each large? stream and every important trail that crossed the boundary. Canada and the United States are both interested In having the line pre- ‘ clsely fixed, and steps ore being taken toward the establishment of a cum-I mission whose determination shall be’ final. In the meantime provisional but accurate work has been done by the! joint party of the geological and coast ‘ and geodetic surveys to redetermine Ltiv i’ti uiu-i in i ri4u ‘iy uia- puted sections, while three other pr- tiea of the geological survey have re- connoitered the entire’stretch of 410 : miies frcm the rrest of the Heckles to i pacific cohV – . – i- I The line traversed two mountain di trick, the Rocky mountains end the Cascades, and an intermediate country which, though hilly, is not so high. The mountains carry heavy forests, and along the line are difficult of access because the trails, once kept open by the Indians, are now greatly obstructed by fallen timber. The surveyors frequent ly nna tne game trails worn by bear ana .jeer tne easiest routes to rollow. ter datea Dubnitza. November 2S. Miss The extreme eastern range of the!K,. r.H Aio.iomo Tiik r. still Rockies is of Alpine character and gla- alive. The Ietter ln question further clers and precipices He across the Bays that at a reCent meeting of the boundary line. The work of the parties committee, held at Dubnitza. it was has been arduous, but has been sue- dellnitely decided not to kill the pris-cessfully carried out. and a report will , oners un3er any pretext whatever, shortly be made through the Interior , Nevertheless, the committee insisted department for the information of our state department. CHALLENGE FOR JEFFRIES. Cleveland. O., Nov. 29. Tom Jen ; kins, the champion wrestler, intends to turn pugilist, and tonight Issued challenge to meet James Jeffries ln a glove contest for the world’s championship and a reasonable side bet. Manager Tuohy will leave Cleveland for ‘ San Eranclsco on Monday morning to bc neurit:, in i mailer ui me maicii. GOLD DISCOVERER DEAD. Denver, Colo.. Nov. 29. Prof. C. W. , Wlnn. who recently created a sensation , mlninft eirdpg by the announcement , that ,e haJ discover a process bv .hlch he could recover enormous gold as low grade ores .died tonight at Sti Joseph’s hospital of strangulated hernia. FRANKLIN SYNDICATE. New York, Nov. 29. The hearing before John A. Straley, as referee in connection with the failure of the broker-ase firm of Sevmour. Johnson & Co.. int(y T.hlch mucn of the money of the , 520 per cent Franklin syndicate is said I ‘ x.XMiK »X For Sale! IF TAKEN AT I ONCE I With a splendid stand of alfalfa, fenced and cross-fenced. A proportionate share of STOCK in the GRAND CANAL goes with this tract.. Six miles Iron: town and only Easy Terms .? .t. , Dwight B. Heard CENTER AND ADAMS Robert A. Amnion, who was counsel for Manaser Miller of the swindling: syndicate, was placed on the stand this afternoon for final examination.’ The aim of the prosecution is to discover the whereabouts of 1140.01)0 of the Miller loot, which is known to exist, but efforts to locate which have so far been in vain. NEW MILITARY POSTS. Board Having the Matter In Charge In Convention. Washington, Nov. 9. The location and distribution of new military posts will be decided by the board of army officers which convened here today in compliance with the order of Secretary Root. The board consists of Lieutenant-General Nelson A. Miles. Major Generals John It. Brooke. Elwell S. Otis, S. M. B. Young. Arthur Mac- Arthur. Brigadier-Generals John C. BateSi George M. Randall and William A Kobbe. , aodltlon to deciding on the loca tion, extent, sizes and character of the new posts and reservations the board will also formulate a project for the lo- . . t .i i t-i H Hiirv-..v of Miten fi it » four r manent grounds of Instruction . the re alar arnly and state national puard to3elher with the probable cos of the sites and the expense of putting them in condition. TRYING AN INCOME TAX LAW. Washington. Nov. 29. The case of Alexander E. Orr and others against Theodore P. Oilman, comptroller of the state of New York, is on the docket for hearing in the supreme court today. The case Involves the Income tax law of the state of New York. LIVESTOCK OF THE COUNTRY ! Meeting of the National Association in Chicago. Chicago, Nov. 23. Stockmen- are be- big stock show, whlcn opens tomor- row. The exposition buiiuing is ai- ready comfortably crowaea ana many new entries arrived today. The expo- sition covers twenty acres of ground. fifteen acres of which are under roof. With cheap railroad rates granted to the exposition from all sections of the country, the management expresses a. confidence that fully a half million peo- pie will be drawn to Chicago next week. Fares made are cheaper than those granted at the time of the  » ui iii r lu.ii ur iui me nuuaiu caiaioi- , tion. The judging of the stock will begin on Monday. On Tuesday the fifth annual convention of the Notional Live Stock association will convene in Stuuebakr halii-n4 tontmue u to and Including Friday. A KilVE SUGGESTION Begardisg the Payment of the Stone Eansom. ‘ Soflla, Nov. 29. According to a let upon the payment of the full amount of I the ransom. A naive suggestion is current in political circles here to tne effect that the United States should force Turkey to pay the remainder of the ransom and. as soon as the pris- . oners are in safety, force Bulgaria to punish those persons guilty of their abduction. With reference to the reports of the death of Miss Stone, the government holds that if the brigands, exasperated by delay, have murdered Miss Stone, Mr. Dickinson, the diplomatic agent of the United States, Is responsible for the delay, and not the government of Bulgaria. The latter has not interfered with Mr. Dickinson’s emissaries, nor did the government move the troops after Mr. Dickinson opened communication with the brigands. NOTHING LIKE LEATHER. Washington. Nov. 29. The census bureau has Issued a preliminary report regarding leather, tanned, cured and finished, for the United States. The Industry fchowed a total capitaliza tion of J173.977.427: an increase of 7S per cent, since 1S90; 1,306 establishment. decrease of 25 per cent; the average number of wage earners 52,109; total j v.-ages $22,591.0?!: cost of materials used $i35.603.034: value of products J.204.03S. 127, an Increase of 19 per cent. The Evans Loan and Investment Go. ESTABLISHES SBPIEKEEE 15, 18S5 Tender Their Services to Conservative Honey Lenders Have for sale an extensive list of business houses, residences, farms or ranches. Our printed list containing many attractive offerings is furnished on application. MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED REAL ESTATE. J. W. EVANS, C J. CORNELL, Prenldent. Secretary. NO’S. 1 AND 3 W. WASHmOTON STREET THE PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK PHOENIX, ARIZONA. Paid-up Capital, $100,000. Surplus and I’ndivided Profits. $50,000. E B. GAGE, PresiiUnt. T. W. P EMBERTON, Vice-President. C. J. HALL, Cashier. L. B. LARIMER, Assistant Cashier. Steel-lined Vaults and Steel Safety Deposit Uox-s. Ueneral Banking Business. Drafts Issued on all principal cities of the world. Directors Jas. A. Fleming, C. J. Hall. O. It. Ric hniond. A. N. Gage. B. Heyman, F. M. Murphy, D. M. Ferry, E. B. Oaire. T. W. Pemlerton. liHOME SAYINGS BANK AND TRDST CO. PHOTCNTX. ARIZONA. CHARLES F. ATNSWORTH, President. S. M. McCOWAN. Vice-President. R. H. GRKEN E, Secretary. Authorized Capital HD0.OO0. Hours 9 a. m. to S p. m. Interest on deposits. No commission on loans. Huch H. Price. Cashier and Treasurer. Directors Charles F. Alnsworth. S. M. McCowan, Hush H. Price. W. C. Foster, R. H. Greene. CUBAN COMPLAINT Of l). S. Interference in Election for Palma MR. ROOT’S REPLY The Cubans are Informed lhat This Country Eas no Interest in tho Personnel of the « Future President, hut That It Will Carry Out the Rules of the Late Constitutional Convention and Generally Oversee Things- Wa8hfngton, Nov. 29 Secretary Root today addressed a communication to Elijo Bonachea, president of the convention at Havana, that nominated Bartolome Masso for president, relative to the complaints that the United States were Interfering in the elections. A press dispatch from Havana stated that Masso complained that the iniluence of United States officers was being exerted In favor of Estrada Palma, and the dispatch from Bonachea to the secretary implied the same thing. The secretary in his communlcaUon to Senor Bonachea, says: « I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch of November 26, saying the national convention at Havana, which proclaimed General Masso, candidate for the presidency of the future republic of Cuba, respectfully asjc you to recommend to the re pre- ( sentatives of the intervening govern ! nr.ent the rtHctest impartiality in th J electoral contest which is now taking place. » « Representatives of the Intervening government in Cuba are already aware that their duty requhes them not only to be merely impartial in the electoral contest In Cubs, hut to refrain from ! interfering in any manner whatever J with a free expression or the wishes of i me v, U uy II people at tne DOllS. Tily have not violated this rule in the oast. and will not In the future. They will have nothing to do with the electoral ; contest, except to enforce the sIMnnl law precroed by tarn constitutional convention and promulgated by the military governor on the 14th of October last. This will be done Impartially and effectively. « It Is quite unnecessary to assume that the officers of this government will be less faithful to their duty hereafter than they have been In the past, or to recommend or direct that they shall perform a duty which they ire already performing. » MR. ROOT’S REPLY. Washington, Nov. 29 Secretary Root has replied to the cablegram of Bar-thelo Masso of Havana, who complained that the American officials are assisting Estrada. Palma In his con test for the presidency of Cuba, asking that they be directed to cease their efforts in this direction. - » i -wi i y iwul iniormea masso tuat PUnited States officials are tnkinir nn Eteps for or against any of the candi dates of Cuba. The secretary bases his reply on a letter received from General Wood. t THE FINANCIAL MARKET Condition of the Stock and Bond List Yesterday. New York. Nov. 29. Atchison. 7Si: Rock Island. 146; Delaware & Hudson. 173i. Erie. 42V4: Great Northern, preferred. 192: Manhattan. 138; Metropolitan Street Railway. 167: Missouri Pacific. 101: Jersey Central, li.it; New York Central. 171: Pennsylvania. 150; St. Paul, 169V4; Southern Pacific. 60. Union Pacific. 103i: Amalgamated Copper. 7514,. Sugar. 12514; United States Steel. 4314; Western Union, 91 V BONDS. United States 2s registed and coupon. 1$8: 3s registered. 10814: coupon. 10S?d: new 4s registered and coupon, 13914; old 4s registered and coupon. 11214: 5s registered and coupon. 107″;,. Money call firm, ruling rate 4 p’.r cent.

Object Description

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Title

Arizona republican, 1901-11-30

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sn84020558

Volume

12

Issue

196

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1

Issue Date

1901-11-30

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Present

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Maricopa County

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Phoenix

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EN

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Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records

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az

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Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records

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AR30

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2012

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Title

Arizona republican, 1901-11-30

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1

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0666.jp2

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.jp2

Full Text

THE AKIZONA REPUBLICAN Ten Pages Ten Pages PnOENTX!, ARIZONA, SAT U It DAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 30, 1901. VOL. XII. NO. 196. TWELFTH YEAB. END OF THE WAR There is No Immediate Trouble in Panama SURRENDER OF COLON It Came About in a Bloodless Way Through ;the Peace-Loving Foreigners, hut the liberals Were Downcast Because They Could Not Go Along Making Harmless Demonstrations. Colon. Nov. 29. The terms of the surrender agreed upon at yesterday’s ; conference held on board the I’nlted States gunboat Marietta, at which the j commanding officers of the ‘ Marietta, , the British cruiser Tribune and the , French cruiser Suchet, Lieutenant I’ommander McCrea of the Machias. Captain Perry of the Iowa, Generals Alban and Jeffries, representing the government of Colombia, Senor te la Kosa, who represented the liberal party, were present, were briefly, as follows: Senor De La Rosa agrreed to surrender the liberal soldiers now at Colon with their arms, to Captain Perry at noon today; Captain Perry, in turn, agrreed to hand over the rr.fcu and their arms, later in the day, to Oeneral Alban who. In turn, guaranteed the life and liberty of all men recently in arms against the conservative government of Colombia. The surrender of arms was to be bona file in every respect. At half-past .eleven o’clock this morning a large number of marines in blue, jackets from the Iowa, the Marietta and the Machias were landed at Colon and proceeded to the barracks. Here the arms belonging to the liberal soldiers were taken over by the Americans in the presence of Captain Perry, and the commanders of the warships above mentioned and the American, British and French consuls at Colon and a large concourse of people who sympathized with the liberals In their surrender. The liberal guard, patrolling Colon, appeared sad and downcast. Their behavior, however, has all along been most praiseworthy, and it is not an exaggeration to say that they have gained the respect of a large portion of the community, especially of the foreign element, during th?ir short administration of Colon. Later in the day. General Alban, accompanied by the offlijals of the conservative government of Colon, arrived here from Panama, and Senor De’La Rosa, representing General Do-  » 7.r 7, creiary ne . surrendered himself and the liberal troops to the conservative general, in the presence of Captain Perry and the naval and consular officers above mentioned.NEW SHOOTING HECOHD An Explanation of Dr. Walker’s He-cent Victory. The bird destroying controversy which has for sometime been going on between Dr. M. M. Walker and County Treasurer J. E. Walker was resumed « yesterday with all Its old time and homicidal bitterness. The recrudescence of this dispute was occasioned by the circumstance that in a bird shooting match between Dr. Walker and W. L. Pinney the latter was beaten. At the same time the field record in this locality was broken and the populace was inclined to crown the doctor, the – case has to do with the right of con-champion of events, in which the birds suinptlves to land here as Immigrants. TAKE A RECORD. See How Many Krfends Are Hurt Coffee. By It would be just as reasonable for a temperance advocate to drink a little diluted whisky as to drink coffee, for one is as truly an intoxicant as the other, and persistence in the use of coffee brings on a variety of chronic diseases, notorious among which are dyspepsia, heart palpitation (and ultimately heart failure), frequently con- ptipation, kidney diseases, many cases Frank James will portray the charac-of weak eyes and trembling condition 1 ter c- a prosperous westerner and will of the nerves. I geen m prince Albert coat, creased This in only a small percentage o trousers and a fedora hat. The curtain the great variety of diseases which wiH go down in the liist act with James come from an unbalanced nervous sys- j n tne center of tne 6taffe. When seen tern, caused by the persistent daily use tHv Bnl(1. or me urug caneine, nn-n v- tive principle of coffee. Another bit of prima facie evidence about coffee Is that the victims to the habit find great difficulty In giving it up. They will solemnly pledge to themselves day after day that they will abandon the use of it when they know that it Is shortening their days, but morning after morning they fail, until they grow to despise themselves for their lack of control. x Anyone interested in this subject would be greatly surprised to make a systematic inquiry among prominent brain workers In America. There are hundreds of thousands of our most prominent people that have abandoned’ coffee altogether and are using Postum Food Coffee in its place, and for the most excellent reasons In the world. Many of them testify that ill-health, nervous prostration, and consequent inability to work, has In times past, pushed them back and out of their proper standing In life, which they have been able to regain by the use of good health, strong nerves, and great vitality, since coffee has been thrown out and Postum put in its place. have to be hunted and when found fly up in a natural and confusing way. This is supposed to be a better test of skill than In shooting; birds released from the trap with mathematical precision and at regular intervals. County Treasurer Walker is disposed to decry the performance o Dr. Walker. He says that It was largely the result of scratch and luck: that in the first place he beat Mr. Pinney by only two birds and in the next there was an interposition of providence in his behalf, of a kind that doesn’t happen once in a thousand years. The doctor, he said, by accident selected the better field and ran into a labyrinth of birds the like of which the oldest inhabitant had never seen. Whe-.i the aoctor stumbled in amonjr thorn they fiew into the air in confusion and circled about trying to find their ‘war- ings so that they could fly away. While ‘ the birds were taking observations the I doctor recovered from shls excitement i and bepan to turn his gun loose into the air. Every shot was necessarily fatal. The doctor hastily threw Li , more cartridges and kept shooting with the result that he soon had himself covered with a feathered canopy formed by the falling birds. Even the sunlight was obscured. In those circumstances, said County Treasurer Walker a second rater might win. He was glad to learn that Dr. Walker had at last beaten somebody; that fact would enhance the value of his own numerous victories over the doctor. Among those present while the coun ty treasurer was making this explanation of the triumph of Dr. Walker was Neri Osborn, the lerk of the board of supervisors who said that he had heard ; so much about shooting lately that hi was almost Inclined to recover some of his old time skill. His long suit was the rifle. It was deer killing that iiad brought him into national prominence and he related an incident of which most old Arizonians have heard and which Indeed has been embalmed in verse by an eastern poet who was in this country for his health and witnessed the performance. It happened, or rather « happen » Is not a good word for that is suggestive of an accident: this thing was enacted on the Santa Maria. The party of which Mr. Osborn was a member saw a deer at so great a distance that there seemed no possibility of taking It. In the absence of athir-teen-inch naval or coast defense gun and there was none nearer than Pre-cott or Yuma. Mr.’ Osborn took what every one believed to be a futile aim with his rifle and pulled the trigger. In a few minutes the deer was observed to fall: the bullet had Just reached him. Then he got up but another shot from the same unerring rifle brought him down again, this time permanently: Mr. OFborn had secured the exact range. When the hunters reached the deer the flesh was found to b? tainted. It was a very warm day in June atri meat could not be kept waiting while a long journey was being made after it. CONSUMPTIVES MUST GO Holing of the Department in the BidenCast Sustained. New York. Nov. 23. tTnited States judge Thomas, sitting in the circuit ft . ,, t , , . . court in Brooklyn, today decided in favor of the ruling of the treasury department at Washington in the case of Thomas Bodin. of Philadelphia. The decision prohibits Bodin, a supposed consumptive, from remaining in the country. Unless the case is appealed to the circuit court of appeals Bodin will be deported one week from tomorrow, probably on the steamship Etrurla, Bodin’s wife and child nave remained from choice at Ellis island, and will accompany Bodin back. Judge Thomas decides thatasasimple question of facts was before him, in the premises he could not officially do otherwise than sustain the treasury department. No question of law, he observes, has been propounded in the writ of habeas cor- pus sworn out by Bodin’s lawyer, The NEW THEATRICAL SUMMARY. Frank James Ex-Bandit Will Take the Stge. Zanesville, O., Nov. 20. After long years of deliberation Frank James, the ex-bandit. Is to become an actor. He will make his professional debut in this city tonight in a play entitled « Across the Continent. » The company will tour Ol.io and several states east. It will not appear west of the Mississippi. This move marks radical change of purpose ‘on my part. But I can do now, without offense to public sentiment, what I could not have done years ago before I had given indisputable proof by my conduct that the apprehensions of those who had no faith in me4 were groundless. I do not expect to be an actor in the true sense of the word. I don t delude myself that I have any talent, and my appearance on the stage will be more of a personal exhibit than a dramatic performance, , ALABAMA M. E. CHURCH. Annison. Ala., Nov. 29. Many delegates and visitors have arrived for th annual North Alabama conference of the M. E. church. South, which will be formality opened here this evening and continue in session through the remain der of the week. Bishop Hendrlx will preside and addresses will be delivered by a number of well known preachers and lavmen. Before adiournlne tha meeting will appoint aeiegates to uw general conference or tne aenomina- tion to be held in Dallas next May. FILIPINO FINANGE How Business ot the Islands May Be Subserved Recommendation by Special Commissioner Conant of a Special Silver Coin to Supplant the Prevalent Mexican Dollar. Washington. Nov. 29. Accompanying: the annual report of Secretary Oage. is a report made by Special Commissioner Charles A. Conant. who was sent to ,he Philippines to investigate the cur- reury fiuiion. ni mum inriiuainiun j will be submitted to congress for its ‘ ri, j lie iiiil iiiihii iuiu ai r . nut. ‘ there shouM be a distinctively Philip-l pine coin’ of silver which Hhall be a legal tender for fifty cents gold, be called the peso and contain twenty-five grammes of silver. The coin Is to be Issued in such quantities as the trade requires, a:vl sustained at a parity with gold by a limitation of the amount coined. The Mexican silver dollar and other coins shall cease to be legal tender after a certain date. It is also recommended that the national banks both of the Philippines and the United States should have authority to estab iisn branches throughout the Islands. and in the United States. The power to issue notes should not he extended ! to any bank having- a capital of les3 i meeting in this city to discuss y’-than $ »00.000. Mort?a?e banks with a 1 terday’s prize fiht between Terry Mc-capital of not lass than a million are ‘, Govern and Young Corbett. The recommended to make loans on real i league will listen to the report by estate. It is recommended that the i treasurer of the t’nited States be authorized to receive deposits from the government of the Philippine islands, and that the treasury of the Philippine islands may be designated by the secretary of war as the legal depository of public moneys. THE STATUS OF THE UTILE It is Now Being Determined in Justice Burnett’s Court. The establishment of the status of the mule in Maricopa county was begun in the court o! Justice Burnett yesterday morning. This matter came up in the case of John M. Hardee against Maricopa county, Charles Pendergast and his bondsmen ex rel. On September 20 of thi3 year a mule belonging to the plaintiff while trying to cross a cul vert in road district No. 2 of which Mr. l endcryast is Uferisor, fe!! through the structure and sustained injuries which have ever since kept him in a state of either incapacity or convalescence. After remonstrating with the board of supervisors for some time on the defective condition of the culvert without any material or financial result, Mr. Hardee brought suit against the county in the sum of S5J and employed Messrs. Baker and Bennett, a firm of toOQ attorneys to collect it for him. The defense is represented by Messrs’. Alexander and Bullard. Mr. Alexander’s interest In the case Is more than professional: he is one of Pendergast’s bondsmen. There was as much difficulty in getting a Jury as if it were a notable murder case and one was not secured until the middle of the afternoon. Ten witnesses were examined for the plaintiff and the sun went uown so that the case was continued until today. Among the witnesses was County Treasurer J. E. Walker, by whose expert testimony the plaintiff desired to find out whether there were any funds to the credit of road dls- t trict No. 2; if there were there would be fome hope of recovery against the county. That was evidently a thought of Mr. Alexander’s. Another expert witness was Dr. F. O. Richmond, who testified as to the dilapidated condition of the mule when he was called in the middle of the night to treat him. He said that all the ligaments were torn from one fore leg and It looked at the time as if it would be necssary to shoot him. He had seen the mule later and while there was an improvement to be noted the mule was still not at himself and perhaps never would be. At present he was walkmg on the heels of his fore feeet and did not seem disposed to adopt any other style of locomotion. He further manifested a general indifference regarding all kinds of farm work. The inference drawn from Dr. Richmond’s testimony was that the mule was less valuable than no mule at all and that the county should b compelled to pay additional damages for not having killed him outright. Then the doctor was subjected to cross-examination by Mr. Alexander, who thought he had caught the witness In a professional error. He understood him to say something about the ligaments on the front part of the mule’s leg when Captain Alexander and ev ery other anatomist, knows that a mule has no ligaments there and If he had them he would not know what to do with them. Dr. Richmond explained that he had spoken only of the ligaments behind the bones of the fore leg. Captain Alexander accepted the explanation and the case proceeded. It was developed that the defense is going to rely largely on a charge of contributory carelessness against the mule. The prosecution is threatening to bring the mule Into court today la- beled -Exhibit No. 1. » FIVE MILES OF HIGH FENCE. Enclosure for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Site About to be Built. St. Louis. Nov. 29. Three contracts hnVA hppn let fnr the construction Of ! the fencing which will enclose the site of the world’s fair at St. Louis in 1903.1 The length is about five miles, enclos- I . ins nearly two square nuien i uu. une miie ot tne tence ih to ue an ujhj j barrier, with steel pickets eight feet high, separating the site from the re-mainder of Forest park: three miles are to be of boards eight feet high topped with barbed wire, and the remaining mile will be of ornamental slabs made of cement strengthened with woven wire. The work Is to be completed within sixty days. ACTIVITY OF FILIPINOS. Manila. Nov. 29. The insurgents are active in the Batangas province. Brigadier Gneeral Bell with a battalion of the Fifth infantry will leave here today to assume command of the troop in Batangas. Recently the insurgents killed a, merchant In the town of ila-tangas, and terrorised the people living in the outskirts of the town, a:id escaped afttr a running fight with a small detachment of the Klghth infantry.PACIFIC MAIL. MUST PAY. San Francisco. Nov. 09. United rcaies commissioner nonn received & i communication today from National . I Commissioner Powderly. advising him that the department had ruled against . the contention of the general agent of . the Pacific Mail Steamship company. I ition was not liable that that corporat for a head tax of $1 on each alien sea. man discharged at this port. THEY SAW THE FIGHT And Think It Was Brutal, Degrading Went So Bepetition. Hartford, oenn.. Nov. :. It is an- nounced today that on Monday the tate Law and Order League will hold « v. Harold Pattison of the First Baptist church, and Colonel Charl Jewell, president of the Hartford Y. M. C. A., who were present at the match as delegates of the league. It la stated that this riort wil! characterize the bout us a brutal affair, A disgrace to Hartford and degrading. It Is also added that a legislative looking toward the abolition of such contests, will be consicered. OPERATION ON GOV. TAFT. Manila, Nov. 29. An operation performed on Governor Taft this afternoon was successful. He expects to start for Washington, December 10, to confer with Secretary Root. LABOR IN PORTO RICO. San Juan, Porto Rico, Nov. 29.- mass meeting of the local labor as- sociations of Porto Rico last evening caned by Santiago IRIeftlas, the agent or tne American Federation or Laoor. i’M.-uiy conaunea. Iplefflas met with tome opponttion. he appeared confident of uniting the local trade organizations with the American Federation of Labor. ILLINOIS MINING. Sprinpfleld. 111.. Nov. 29. Members of the state mining: board of Illinois met in special session at the state house yesterday. The purpose of the meeting is to examine candidates applying; for certificates as mine managers, mine examiners and hoisting engineers. LETTER CARRIERS MEET. Rockford. III.. Nov. 29. Preparations have been completed for the reception and entertainment of the delegates to ths annual convention of the state association of letter carriers, v.’hich will be held In Rockford tomorrow. Indl- cations, point to the largest convention in the -history of the association. THE ARMY AND NAVY Gridiron The Seventh Annual Contest, Philadelphia. Pa.. Nov. 29. Tomor- row. at Franklin Field, for the seventh time the army and navy will meet on the gridiron. At the last contest the army received an unexpected defeat, that quite took the conceit out of the.value8 from what have been refrarded soldiers, who. with their friends and adherents, had believed there could be but on result to the game. The navy proved It otherwise. The army Intends to redeem the day tomorrow. Whether intention and. fact will be In wedlock Joined is the question now. Meanwhile both teams have been in earnest training for the only game they really care to win. The rivalry though intense is most generous, and nd is oniy mat w men comes irom tne pro- of national defense. Six games have been played hereto- fore. The army won two of these and West Point In 1890, when the score was’t army, 0; navy 24. The second, at An-j.f. napolls. in 1S91, when the armyJ » turned the tables on the navy and beat it by a score of 32 to 16. The navy was overwhelmed with mortification, and sent a team the next year to West X Point that reversed the result by score of 12 to the navy to 4 for the’y army. In 1S93, the navy, at Annapolis, I X was victorious by a score of 6 to Then came an Interval of six years be- jf tween games, largely, if not entirely, .C due to the charge emanating fromj army circles that thwe contests engen- (y dered bad feeling between the two in- V stltutions. This idea has been stren- 1 uously combated. A better opinion prevailed fn 1899, and the result was’X that at Franklin Field the army won’- by a score of 17 to 5. The soldiers’; found a weak spot in the line of the’ navy and battered at it all the time ‘ y-and won their laurels by an applica-jj tlon of good army tactics on the grld-’J. iron hitting the enemy hardest where v you find him weakest. Last year the navy again turned the tables on the ‘ young men from West Point by win-’ nlng by a score of li to 11. A large delegation of army and navy . m.,i., i.. special train from Washington. NORTHERN BOUNDARY From Crest of Rockies to the Pacific Coast An International Commission to Make a Final Decision Treaty Hade in 1846 bnt Line Never Fixed. Seattle, Nov. 29. An international boundary commission is to be established by the United States and Canada, the object being to finally deterr mine the correct boundary of the Mount Baker mining district. The United States geological survey , has issued a bulletin, which outlines the plan and describes tne purposes as follows; -. Uurlng the past summer tne (.nitea states geological survey aim me and geodetic survey have been co-oper- « tins In a work of unusual importance and Interest in redetermining the line of the international boundary oetween tne united states unci canuus liumi the crest of the Rocky mountains to the Pacific ocean. The original treaty, signed in 1S4, which established the boundary at the 49th parallel, did not provide for its Immediate survey over this section. This was due partly to the extreme difficulty and even danger of conducting surveys In this region at the time, and partly to the prevailing opinions that so rough and distant a region would be settled i only in a very remote future, j This view still prevailed to a certain I extent when In 1857 and 1S51 surveys f were actually carried out. for it was n-A..nrnon. thof it was Inexpedient to incur the expense of locating and marking the boundary continuously because, as they say in their official report, the country would not be occupied for generations to ginning to pour into Chicago for the come. The commissions did, however, ‘ meeting of the National Live Stock as-determine the 49th parallel by astro-’ sociation next week, and attend the nomlcal observations, and established monumenta accordingly on each large? stream and every important trail that crossed the boundary. Canada and the United States are both interested In having the line pre- ‘ clsely fixed, and steps ore being taken toward the establishment of a cum-I mission whose determination shall be’ final. In the meantime provisional but accurate work has been done by the! joint party of the geological and coast ‘ and geodetic surveys to redetermine Ltiv i’ti uiu-i in i ri4u ‘iy uia- puted sections, while three other pr- tiea of the geological survey have re- connoitered the entire’stretch of 410 : miies frcm the rrest of the Heckles to i pacific cohV – . – i- I The line traversed two mountain di trick, the Rocky mountains end the Cascades, and an intermediate country which, though hilly, is not so high. The mountains carry heavy forests, and along the line are difficult of access because the trails, once kept open by the Indians, are now greatly obstructed by fallen timber. The surveyors frequent ly nna tne game trails worn by bear ana .jeer tne easiest routes to rollow. ter datea Dubnitza. November 2S. Miss The extreme eastern range of the!K,. r.H Aio.iomo Tiik r. still Rockies is of Alpine character and gla- alive. The Ietter ln question further clers and precipices He across the Bays that at a reCent meeting of the boundary line. The work of the parties committee, held at Dubnitza. it was has been arduous, but has been sue- dellnitely decided not to kill the pris-cessfully carried out. and a report will , oners un3er any pretext whatever, shortly be made through the Interior , Nevertheless, the committee insisted department for the information of our state department. CHALLENGE FOR JEFFRIES. Cleveland. O., Nov. 29. Tom Jen ; kins, the champion wrestler, intends to turn pugilist, and tonight Issued challenge to meet James Jeffries ln a glove contest for the world’s championship and a reasonable side bet. Manager Tuohy will leave Cleveland for ‘ San Eranclsco on Monday morning to bc neurit:, in i mailer ui me maicii. GOLD DISCOVERER DEAD. Denver, Colo.. Nov. 29. Prof. C. W. , Wlnn. who recently created a sensation , mlninft eirdpg by the announcement , that ,e haJ discover a process bv .hlch he could recover enormous gold as low grade ores .died tonight at Sti Joseph’s hospital of strangulated hernia. FRANKLIN SYNDICATE. New York, Nov. 29. The hearing before John A. Straley, as referee in connection with the failure of the broker-ase firm of Sevmour. Johnson & Co.. int(y T.hlch mucn of the money of the , 520 per cent Franklin syndicate is said I ‘ x.XMiK »X For Sale! IF TAKEN AT I ONCE I With a splendid stand of alfalfa, fenced and cross-fenced. A proportionate share of STOCK in the GRAND CANAL goes with this tract.. Six miles Iron: town and only Easy Terms .? .t. , Dwight B. Heard CENTER AND ADAMS Robert A. Amnion, who was counsel for Manaser Miller of the swindling: syndicate, was placed on the stand this afternoon for final examination.’ The aim of the prosecution is to discover the whereabouts of 1140.01)0 of the Miller loot, which is known to exist, but efforts to locate which have so far been in vain. NEW MILITARY POSTS. Board Having the Matter In Charge In Convention. Washington, Nov. 9. The location and distribution of new military posts will be decided by the board of army officers which convened here today in compliance with the order of Secretary Root. The board consists of Lieutenant-General Nelson A. Miles. Major Generals John It. Brooke. Elwell S. Otis, S. M. B. Young. Arthur Mac- Arthur. Brigadier-Generals John C. BateSi George M. Randall and William A Kobbe. , aodltlon to deciding on the loca tion, extent, sizes and character of the new posts and reservations the board will also formulate a project for the lo- . . t .i i t-i H Hiirv-..v of Miten fi it » four r manent grounds of Instruction . the re alar arnly and state national puard to3elher with the probable cos of the sites and the expense of putting them in condition. TRYING AN INCOME TAX LAW. Washington. Nov. 29. The case of Alexander E. Orr and others against Theodore P. Oilman, comptroller of the state of New York, is on the docket for hearing in the supreme court today. The case Involves the Income tax law of the state of New York. LIVESTOCK OF THE COUNTRY ! Meeting of the National Association in Chicago. Chicago, Nov. 23. Stockmen- are be- big stock show, whlcn opens tomor- row. The exposition buiiuing is ai- ready comfortably crowaea ana many new entries arrived today. The expo- sition covers twenty acres of ground. fifteen acres of which are under roof. With cheap railroad rates granted to the exposition from all sections of the country, the management expresses a. confidence that fully a half million peo- pie will be drawn to Chicago next week. Fares made are cheaper than those granted at the time of the  » ui iii r lu.ii ur iui me nuuaiu caiaioi- , tion. The judging of the stock will begin on Monday. On Tuesday the fifth annual convention of the Notional Live Stock association will convene in Stuuebakr halii-n4 tontmue u to and Including Friday. A KilVE SUGGESTION Begardisg the Payment of the Stone Eansom. ‘ Soflla, Nov. 29. According to a let upon the payment of the full amount of I the ransom. A naive suggestion is current in political circles here to tne effect that the United States should force Turkey to pay the remainder of the ransom and. as soon as the pris- . oners are in safety, force Bulgaria to punish those persons guilty of their abduction. With reference to the reports of the death of Miss Stone, the government holds that if the brigands, exasperated by delay, have murdered Miss Stone, Mr. Dickinson, the diplomatic agent of the United States, Is responsible for the delay, and not the government of Bulgaria. The latter has not interfered with Mr. Dickinson’s emissaries, nor did the government move the troops after Mr. Dickinson opened communication with the brigands. NOTHING LIKE LEATHER. Washington. Nov. 29. The census bureau has Issued a preliminary report regarding leather, tanned, cured and finished, for the United States. The Industry fchowed a total capitaliza tion of J173.977.427: an increase of 7S per cent, since 1S90; 1,306 establishment. decrease of 25 per cent; the average number of wage earners 52,109; total j v.-ages $22,591.0?!: cost of materials used $i35.603.034: value of products J.204.03S. 127, an Increase of 19 per cent. The Evans Loan and Investment Go. ESTABLISHES SBPIEKEEE 15, 18S5 Tender Their Services to Conservative Honey Lenders Have for sale an extensive list of business houses, residences, farms or ranches. Our printed list containing many attractive offerings is furnished on application. MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED REAL ESTATE. J. W. EVANS, C J. CORNELL, Prenldent. Secretary. NO’S. 1 AND 3 W. WASHmOTON STREET THE PHOENIX NATIONAL BANK PHOENIX, ARIZONA. Paid-up Capital, $100,000. Surplus and I’ndivided Profits. $50,000. E B. GAGE, PresiiUnt. T. W. P EMBERTON, Vice-President. C. J. HALL, Cashier. L. B. LARIMER, Assistant Cashier. Steel-lined Vaults and Steel Safety Deposit Uox-s. Ueneral Banking Business. Drafts Issued on all principal cities of the world. Directors Jas. A. Fleming, C. J. Hall. O. It. Ric hniond. A. N. Gage. B. Heyman, F. M. Murphy, D. M. Ferry, E. B. Oaire. T. W. Pemlerton. liHOME SAYINGS BANK AND TRDST CO. PHOTCNTX. ARIZONA. CHARLES F. ATNSWORTH, President. S. M. McCOWAN. Vice-President. R. H. GRKEN E, Secretary. Authorized Capital HD0.OO0. Hours 9 a. m. to S p. m. Interest on deposits. No commission on loans. Huch H. Price. Cashier and Treasurer. Directors Charles F. Alnsworth. S. M. McCowan, Hush H. Price. W. C. Foster, R. H. Greene. CUBAN COMPLAINT Of l). S. Interference in Election for Palma MR. ROOT’S REPLY The Cubans are Informed lhat This Country Eas no Interest in tho Personnel of the « Future President, hut That It Will Carry Out the Rules of the Late Constitutional Convention and Generally Oversee Things- Wa8hfngton, Nov. 29 Secretary Root today addressed a communication to Elijo Bonachea, president of the convention at Havana, that nominated Bartolome Masso for president, relative to the complaints that the United States were Interfering in the elections. A press dispatch from Havana stated that Masso complained that the iniluence of United States officers was being exerted In favor of Estrada Palma, and the dispatch from Bonachea to the secretary implied the same thing. The secretary in his communlcaUon to Senor Bonachea, says: « I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch of November 26, saying the national convention at Havana, which proclaimed General Masso, candidate for the presidency of the future republic of Cuba, respectfully asjc you to recommend to the re pre- ( sentatives of the intervening govern ! nr.ent the rtHctest impartiality in th J electoral contest which is now taking place. » « Representatives of the Intervening government in Cuba are already aware that their duty requhes them not only to be merely impartial in the electoral contest In Cubs, hut to refrain from ! interfering in any manner whatever J with a free expression or the wishes of i me v, U uy II people at tne DOllS. Tily have not violated this rule in the oast. and will not In the future. They will have nothing to do with the electoral ; contest, except to enforce the sIMnnl law precroed by tarn constitutional convention and promulgated by the military governor on the 14th of October last. This will be done Impartially and effectively. « It Is quite unnecessary to assume that the officers of this government will be less faithful to their duty hereafter than they have been In the past, or to recommend or direct that they shall perform a duty which they ire already performing. » MR. ROOT’S REPLY. Washington, Nov. 29 Secretary Root has replied to the cablegram of Bar-thelo Masso of Havana, who complained that the American officials are assisting Estrada. Palma In his con test for the presidency of Cuba, asking that they be directed to cease their efforts in this direction. - » i -wi i y iwul iniormea masso tuat PUnited States officials are tnkinir nn Eteps for or against any of the candi dates of Cuba. The secretary bases his reply on a letter received from General Wood. t THE FINANCIAL MARKET Condition of the Stock and Bond List Yesterday. New York. Nov. 29. Atchison. 7Si: Rock Island. 146; Delaware & Hudson. 173i. Erie. 42V4: Great Northern, preferred. 192: Manhattan. 138; Metropolitan Street Railway. 167: Missouri Pacific. 101: Jersey Central, li.it; New York Central. 171: Pennsylvania. 150; St. Paul, 169V4; Southern Pacific. 60. Union Pacific. 103i: Amalgamated Copper. 7514,. Sugar. 12514; United States Steel. 4314; Western Union, 91 V BONDS. United States 2s registed and coupon. 1$8: 3s registered. 10814: coupon. 10S?d: new 4s registered and coupon, 13914; old 4s registered and coupon. 11214: 5s registered and coupon. 107″;,. Money call firm, ruling rate 4 p’.r cent.

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Arizona republican, 1901-11-30 :: Arizona Republican